By Molly Jane KremerUndercover is our opportunity to lovingly gaze upon gorgeous works from magnificent artists. Each week, we single out the most striking covers that grace comic book stands and gush all over them.

This week, we’re so stoked about Marguerite Bennett and G. Willow Wilson’s A-Force (#reviewpending!) that we’ve decided to devote this installment to the book’s marvelous covers! Behold!

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A-Force #1, by Russell Dauterman. (Marvel Comics)

Russell Dauterman’s variant to A-Force is a swirl of beauteous smashing and smashing beauty. Aided by the ever-effervescent colors of his Thor compatriot Matthew Wilson, Dauterman illustrates seven of the Marvel Universe’s most powerful ladies flying in a collision course aimed directly at your face. Showing a flair for fashion (Nico’s vinyl leggings and witch boots! Dazzler’s mirror-ball roller-skates!), wry smirks, and, as always, upsettingly gorgeous hair, this cover once again proves that Dauterman and Wilson are two of Marvel’s premiere talents.

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A-Force #1, by Stephanie Hans. (Marvel Comics)

Stephanie Hans knows how to illustrate the ethereal, and her cover to A-Force is a prime example of that. Focusing on Singularity, a new character debuting in the book, she’s colored in blacks and deep blues, with sparkles of a starfield shimmering across her form. A few bright stars float near her eyes — with irises like tiny moons — as her gaze reaches upward, almost hopeful, with vertical brushstrokes bringing the viewer’s eye towards the title. It’s elegant in its simplicity, and a fitting cover for a book starring some of Marvel Comics’ most aspirational and illuminating ladies.

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A-Force #1, by Adam Hughes. (Marvel Comics)

Though Adam Hughes might be famous for illustrating gorgeous ladies (he has, more than a few times, defined the words “homina, homina”) but he is also a master of layouts and color. His variant to this week’s A-Force #1 shows the Queen Medusa reclining at the center, with copious swathes of her red hair cleverly forming images of her fellow Inhumans, both subjects and fellow royalty. Lockjaw subtly hangs out in the background, his eyes and tuning fork both glowing brightly. More fascinating and lovely details await the viewer’s attention.

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A-Force #1, by Sara Pichelli. (Marvel Comics)

By this point you may have noticed that I kinda really like all these A-Force variants. Sara Pichelli’s take throws in some adorable details: Dazzler paints her nails, Jubilee blithely texts on her phone, and a lock of Medusa’s hair is about to get fresh with She-Hulk. Pichelli, like Russell Dauterman, delightfully renders Dazzler in her trademark sparkling roller skates, and ups the fashion ante with Nico’s super-cute outfit. It’s a winner.

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A-Force #1, by Skottie Young. (Marvel Comics)

Again focusing on Medusa and her unruly mane, Skottie Young’s baby variant to A-Force #1 is just cute as hell. Held captive by her animated hair (Medusa’s grin is enormously snotty), all the girls on the cover run the emotional gamut between anger and acceptance, to rage and straight chillin’ (Jubilee’s just blowin’ bubbles, not a care in the world). Young’s work is exuberance given form, and this is yet another prime example of that.

MJ’s review of A-Force #1 is coming soon! Stay tuned!